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Posted on: May, 05/23/2012

The recent discovery of a 1988 Bicentennial $10 note with an AB 57 serial prefix, and a serial number beginning with the digits “94”, has brought fresh scrutiny of the characteristics that have long been used to differentiate between the two production runs of Australia’s circulating bicentennial $10 polymer banknotes.

 Front of R310b $10 Note with AB 57 94 serials

 

It is not yet clear whether the newly-identified note is simply a serial numbering oddity, or an important exception to the long-held rule used by numismatists to classify Australia’s first commemorative banknote....

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Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
Comments: (8)
Posted on: Jan, 01/18/2012

As someone that has been exposed to a reasonable number of coins on a daily basis for well over a decade now, it isn't often at all that a heavily worn penny registers as being of any import or interest at all.

The 1827 penny is a major exception to this rule however - not only is it one of the rarest British pennies issued in the 19th century, but it is unique among the British "token" (i.e. copper and silver) coinage series in that it is widely believed to have been solely struck for circulation in Australia.

GB1D1827

 

I strongly believe that...

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Category [ Tags: Proclamation and Colonial Coins ]
Comments: (5)
Posted on: Dec, 12/23/2011

There are certain auctions that capture the zeitgest or mood of a particular period of activity in the Australian numismatic market, the auction of the Pratley collection of Australian half sovereigns, held in Sydney in March of 1989 by Spink Auctions (Australia), certainly captured the mood of the half sovereign market in Australia of the 1980's.

The Australian Half sovereign series is one that is formidable to many collectors - many dates are rare in any condition, and are nigh impossible to obtain in mint state. This presents an insurmountable problem for most collectors of average means, both financially and in terms of patience!

To complete a set of Australian half sovereigns requires dedication, knowledge and diligence (not to mention a good...

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Category [ Tags: Australian Gold Coinage ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Dec, 12/21/2011

An increasingly popular numismatic field are the coins struck prior to the Australian "Proclamation" era of 1788 - 1826.

This area of Australian numismatics is generally described as being "pre-settlement coinage", and includes coins related to Australian history before settlement in 1788.

Numerous silver coins have been recovered from several Dutch shipwrecks (dating back to the early 1600s) along the Western Australian coast, these artefacts make for fascinating study.

The wrecks themselves are clear evidence of European contact with the Australian continent well before the arrival of Arthur Phillip in 1788, and the coins (perhaps contentiously) may be regarded as Australia’s first coins. Exploring the background to these coins and the...

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Category [ Tags: Proclamation and Colonial Coins ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Aug, 08/17/2011

Many dictionaries state that the word “provenance” comes from the French word “provenir” (to come from), and is variously used to describe the origin or the source of something (wine and even fresh meat are two topical examples), or covers to the history of the ownership of an object (as in the case of art or collectibles).

In numismatic terms, a provenance provides a chronology of previous owners, and often the channel through which the item was purchased.

Documented evidence of provenance can help establish that a coin or note is genuine, has not been altered, and that it comes with good title.A provenance can not only establish the background to a coin, but it can confirm the importance that a coin had in the collections it was...

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Comments: (4)
Posted on: Aug, 08/14/2011

Many folks new to the numismatic market believe that a complete set of a particular series of coins or banknotes is a wondrous thing – they’re of the opinion that once all the gaps in a set are filled, the jackpot wheels start spinning. Experienced collectors of course know that that’s quite true, well not quite.

One dictionary definition of the term “collect” is “to obtain and keep objects of similar type because of their interest, value or beauty.”

It follows then that the aim of most collectors is to obtain a representative example of each similar item within a particular series, and then present it in a way that enhances the interest, value and beauty in each item. Ask any collector – there’s nothing more rewarding than to look...

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Comments: (0)
Posted on: Aug, 08/09/2011

The Commonwealth coin market is always active with collectors, no matter how well the economy is doing – you don't need to have great licks of money to enjoy this series, and it costs nothing at all to study it.

The advent of eBay brought in a large number of new collectors into the market for Commonwealth coins, and as always the florin and the penny are the most popular denominations with new collectors. Values of the key date coins in the florin and penny series have risen strongly on the back of this demand, as these collectors continue on with their hobby, this demand is filtering across into other dates and denominations.

The Melbourne Centenary florin has also increased in popularity in a big way – despite the fact it has a mintage that's pretty small relative to other dates in the...

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Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Coins ]
Comments: (6)
Posted on: Aug, 08/02/2011

The Background to Melbourne's The Star Newspaper

The Star” was a daily evening newspaper that was first published in Melbourne on October 28th...

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Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Coins ]
Comments: (1)
Posted on: Jul, 07/15/2011

Much of the following information first appeared as an article in the Australasian Coin & Banknote Magazine, written by Mr Ian Todd. Ian's numismatic interested have varied over time, however the common thread between each area that he has been active in has been rich history and collector appeal. Although there has been a good degree of research published on the paper notes printed by the internees at Camp Seven in Hay (NSW) during World War II, far less has been published on the background to and technical characteristics of the copper and brass tokens used by inmates across the internment camps of Australasia at the same time.

I hope...

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Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Coins ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Jul, 07/15/2011

The DBP $1 note is one that has been enthusiastically pursued by decimal note collectors for decades, although it's perhaps only in the past decade or so that collector interest has started to drive their value to a level that matches their historical appeal and rarity.

They are the first Australian notes to have been officially confirmed as being a very limited run of test notes, and they are the only Australian notes issued since Federation that have been proven to be directly related to several Australian cities - Perth, Brisbane and Hobart. The mintage of one million notes is exactly the same as the Coombs & Wilson first and last prefixes, and nearly as low as some star replacement notes - all of these notes are at present worth much, much more....

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Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
Comments: (2)

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