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Posted on: Oct, 10/13/2015

Saudi Aramco (Arabian American Oil Company) owns, operates and develops all energy resources based in Saudi Arabia, and as a result is believed to be the world’s most valuable company.

The relationship between the United States and the Saudi government is well known as being both lucrative and complex for both sides. It is also well known that this relationship has been tested numerous times over the past 70 years, most significantly when it became known that 15 of the 19 terrorists involved in the September 2011 terrorist attacks on New York were Saudi citizens.

American Gold for Saudi Arabia?

In the context of these recent events, many coin collectors are fascinated and intrigued to learn that the US Mint at Philadelphia struck a number of gold “discs” for the...

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Category [ Tags: World Numismatics ]
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Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

Specimen banknotes are a specific type of banknote produced by issuing authorities around the world whenever there is a significant change to a nation's legal tender.

Well before the first print run of  notes intended for circulation is commenced, a very small batch of notes is printed and marked with a special printed or perforated cancellation of some sort – these notes are then retained and distributed for archival, communication or presentation purposes.

It has been standard practice for the the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) to keep a certain number of these specimen notes for Australia's National Currency Museum in Martin Place (Sydney, NSW).

The main focus of this museum is to showcase each major change to Australia's circulating...

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Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
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Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

The Dardanelles Overprints

The Dardanelles Overprints are a series of British banknotes (ten shillings and one pound) over-printed in Arabic and issued for use by Allied soldiers serving at Gallipoli between May and June 1915. As there were no Allied military canteens on the Dardanelles, these notes were issued to the troops so they were able to buy items from the locals. 

The "host" notes are the standard "Bradbury" one pound and ten shilling notes that were in circulation in the United Kingdom at that time. These bank notes were...

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Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Banknotes ]
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Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

The “Rainbow Pound” is a truly historic Australian note - it’s history is intimately tied to our nation’s involvement in World War I.

This important note received its name due to the pattern of colours that are seen in the designs either side.

Australia's "Rainbow" Pound - Currency Directly Linked to WWI

As has been the case in times of crisis since the dawn of time, the Australian public chose to hoard gold, silver and copper coins during World War I, and spent only the paper currency they received.

This was a...

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Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Banknotes ]
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Posted on: Apr, 04/02/2015

It’s hardly within my area of expertise to provide you with a concise and entirely accurate introduction to the history of Maundy Thursday, and the role that coins have played in it (in the United Kingdom), so be advised that the information that follows has been entirely collated from information that’s readily available online - click any of the links for more information about the subjects discussed.

Many sources describe Maundy Thursday as the Christian holy day just before Good Friday, and that it commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles. The term “maundy” refers to the foot-washing ceremony that Jesus Christ originally performed on his disciples....

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Category [ Tags: World Numismatics ]
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Posted on: Nov, 11/18/2014

Gough Whitlam

The voice boomed down the phone and caught me a little off guard. It being the middle of an otherwise ordinary afternoon and me being an ordinary coin dealer in suburban Sydney, I wasn’t used to being slammed in the ear by a force of nature while sitting at my desk.

“Andrew Crellin?” the caller demanded.

“Yes, it is” I replied coolly, by now intrigued and unsettled all at once.

Anyone that deals with the general public on a regular basis is used to seeing most colours in the rainbow of humanity over any one day, and I’m reluctant to admit I was steeling myself for a shade further out the spectrum shall we say, when...

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Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
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Posted on: Sep, 09/24/2014

The 1852 Adelaide Ingots are counted among Australia’s most historic numismatic items - they were the very first items produced by the Adelaide Assay Office following the discovery of gold at Mount Alexander (in Victoria) in November 1851. 

These enigmatic slabs of gold are incredibly rare - just 2 exist in private hands anywhere in the world.

According to a noted authority on the Adelaide Assay Office, James Hunt-Deacon, “The introduction of the Bullion Act and the subsequent coinage … was a masterly stroke of legislature, and played no small part in averting economic catastrophe and laying the foundation for a stabilized currency.[1]

Electrotypes Are Widely Regarded As...

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Category [ Tags: Australian Gold Coinage ]
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Posted on: Sep, 09/12/2014

The 1852 Adelaide Pound is Australia’s first gold coin, minted in response to problems caused by the discovery of gold at Mount Alexander (Victoria) in November 1851.

It is one of Australia’s rarest and most coveted coins, and is seldom seen on the collector market. The story surrounding its conception, production and withdrawal has several threads that have been shown to have enduring appeal – the perseverance and foresight of George Tinline; the leadership of Sir Henry Young; the ingenuity of the Assay Office staff and the enterprise of all those that flocked to the goldfields are all stories that strike a chord with Australians in the 21st century.

Imminent and Immediate Peril

A definitive description of the woeful state of the South Australian economy prior to...

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Category [ Tags: Australian Gold Coinage ]
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Posted on: Sep, 09/01/2014

The silver Resolution and Adventure medallion commemorates Captain James Cook’s Second Voyage across the Southern Hemisphere, a pioneering journey that fundamentally changed the way the world was viewed.

It has long been regarded as a key item in Australian numismatics, and unequivocally rates as one of the most desirable items of Captain Cook memorabilia available. Not only does it remain a direct link to one of the greatest explorers the world has ever known, it is also strongly connected to the man regarded by many as being “The Father of Australia”[1], Sir Joseph Banks.

...

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Category [ Tags: Proclamation and Colonial Coins ]
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Posted on: Aug, 08/07/2014

The Rapid was an early 19th-century American vessel that wrecked on Ningaloo Reef (NW WA coast) in 1811. It was bound for Canton (Guangzhou) in China, and had a cargo of 280,000 Spanish silver dollars when it sank. 

Not only was this an incredible sum of money in those days (the weight of this silver was just shy of 8 tonnes), the survival story of the men on the Rapid is one of hardship and endurance. In addition to that, the discovery of the wreck in 1978 has been described as being one of the most incredible finds in Australian maritime history.

...

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Category [ Tags: Proclamation and Colonial Coins ]
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