Stay One Step Ahead

Research

Posted on: Jan, 01/06/2016

Banks of Western Australia

West Australians are often rightly characterised as generally being a parochial bunch, this provincialism mean that in the days before the Commonwealth Government assumed control over the issue of Australia’s circulating currency notes in 1910, most West Australians preferred to bank with either the Bank of Western Australia or the Western Australian Bank.

Banks that had been founded outside the colony of WA found it difficult to establish a presence here, the Bank of Australasia prime among them.

Strong Local Support

The history of the Bank of Australasia in West Australia has two chapters - the first runs between 1841 and 1846, when a branch was established in Perth. Mick Vort Ronald's research indicated that there...

read more
Category [ Tags: Pre-Federation Notes ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Dec, 12/21/2015

 The 1911 Specimen Penny

Although this incredibly important Australian coin has appeared at auction twice in the past 18 months, in my opinion collectors don’t yet fully appreciate just how historically important and rare it is.

This coin is in fact an archival-standard strike of Australia’s very first penny - it is one of only 2 known in private hands, and was struck for the express purpose of officially recording the start of the production of Australia’s first Commonwealth pennies.

It is important for a number of reasons - not only is it one the very first Australian pennies ever struck, it also showed for the first...

read more
Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Coins ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Dec, 12/10/2015

The deployment of the world’s first polymer banknotes in 1988 was so successful that it appeared to many to be an overnight success. One day we were using paper banknotes, the next we were handling notes made from plastic. The notes were so finished, with complete designs, nation-wide distribution and even a publicity campaign, that there was little thought given to the process that led to that point.

1977 CSIRO Polymer Test Note

Truly innovative technology doesn’t just come into existence overnight of course, the evolution of the technology used to print...

read more
Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Dec, 12/04/2015

The Great Depression

The Great Depression ensured the rarity of many coins & banknotes issued at the time - as the graph on this page shows, economic activity was so limited during the Depression that the number of coins minted in 1932 was just 6% of that produced in 1927.

The rarity of the 1932 florin is directly linked to “the worst year of the Depression”.

The crash in the...

read more
Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Coins ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Oct, 10/13/2015

The document I’m referring to isn’t specifically about “Australian” sovereigns, but was written on the British sovereigns featuring Joseph Edgar Boehm’s  “Jubilee” portrait of Queen Victoria, stuck by the Royal Mint between 1887 and 1893. The brochure is called “The Jubilee Head Gold Sovereign”, and has been written by David Iverson and Stephen Hill. (Click that link to read it online.)

As the mints located in Australia at that time (Sydney and Melbourne) were branches of the Royal Mint (and were not “Australian” mints per se), they are also covered by this document. If you haven’t already guessed it, the document was...

read more
Category [ Tags: Australian Gold Coinage ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Oct, 10/13/2015

Saudi Aramco (Arabian American Oil Company) owns, operates and develops all energy resources based in Saudi Arabia, and as a result is believed to be the world’s most valuable company.

The relationship between the United States and the Saudi government is well known as being both lucrative and complex for both sides. It is also well known that this relationship has been tested numerous times over the past 70 years, most significantly when it became known that 15 of the 19 terrorists involved in the September 2011 terrorist attacks on New York were Saudi citizens.

American Gold for Saudi Arabia?

In the context of these recent events, many coin collectors are fascinated and intrigued to learn that the US Mint at Philadelphia struck a number of gold “discs” for the...

read more
Category [ Tags: World Numismatics ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

Specimen banknotes are a specific type of banknote produced by issuing authorities around the world whenever there is a significant change to a nation's legal tender.

Well before the first print run of  notes intended for circulation is commenced, a very small batch of notes is printed and marked with a special printed or perforated cancellation of some sort – these notes are then retained and distributed for archival, communication or presentation purposes.

It has been standard practice for the the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) to keep a certain number of these specimen notes for Australia's National Currency Museum in Martin Place (Sydney, NSW).

The main focus of this museum is to showcase each major change to Australia's circulating...

read more
Category [ Tags: Decimal Coins & Banknotes ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

The Dardanelles Overprints

The Dardanelles Overprints are a series of British banknotes (ten shillings and one pound) over-printed in Arabic and issued for use by Allied soldiers serving at Gallipoli between May and June 1915. As there were no Allied military canteens on the Dardanelles, these notes were issued to the troops so they were able to buy items from the locals. 

The "host" notes are the standard "Bradbury" one pound and ten shilling notes that were in circulation in the United Kingdom at that time. These bank notes were...

read more
Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Banknotes ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Apr, 04/25/2015

The “Rainbow Pound” is a truly historic Australian note - it’s history is intimately tied to our nation’s involvement in World War I.

This important note received its name due to the pattern of colours that are seen in the designs either side.

Australia's "Rainbow" Pound - Currency Directly Linked to WWI

As has been the case in times of crisis since the dawn of time, the Australian public chose to hoard gold, silver and copper coins during World War I, and spent only the paper currency they received.

This was a...

read more
Category [ Tags: Commonwealth Banknotes ]
Comments: (0)
Posted on: Apr, 04/02/2015

It’s hardly within my area of expertise to provide you with a concise and entirely accurate introduction to the history of Maundy Thursday, and the role that coins have played in it (in the United Kingdom), so be advised that the information that follows has been entirely collated from information that’s readily available online - click any of the links for more information about the subjects discussed.

Many sources describe Maundy Thursday as the Christian holy day just before Good Friday, and that it commemorates the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles. The term “maundy” refers to the foot-washing ceremony that Jesus Christ originally performed on his disciples....

read more
Category [ Tags: World Numismatics ]
Comments: (0)

Pages